Weekend reading

Seira Wilson on January 10, 2020
Share

The weather forecasts are predicting snow, and if that happens everything in Seattle pretty much screeches to a halt. On the positive side, that also means plenty of time for reading! As usual, we've got a pretty healthy mix of books in our collective bag, including a debut novel that is a hopeful homage to the power of books, a memoir described as "Nora Ephron for the Tinder age," the inside story of a dangerous southern cult, and a mystery to honor the late, great, M.C. Beaton. 




Print Book
Kindle Book
Audible Audiobook

The Girl with the Louding Voice: A Novel by Abi Daré

Abi Daré’s debut novel, The Girl with the Louding Voice, is like a blend of Etaf Rum’s A Woman Is No Man and Tara Westover’s Educated. So, buckle up. In it a fourteen-year-old Nigerian woman is sold into servitude by her father when her mother—a proponent of education—succumbs to illness and dies. You will root for Adunni as she attempts to escape her sorry, and often harrowing, lot, and the kind strangers who buoy her efforts (and spirits). This tale of courage and pluck, which is also an homage to the power of books, is buoying mine too. —Erin Kodicek



Print Book
Kindle Book
Audible Audiobook

Broken Faith: Inside the Word of Faith Fellowship, One of America's Most Dangerous Cults by Mitch Weiss

I'm fascinated by cults. Whenever there's a book or a documentary coming out, I'm all over it.  So of course I snatched the galley of Broken Faith (February 8) right off the table the minute it was unpacked. The authors are acclaimed investigative journalists and they pulled together hours of interviews, secret recordings, and documents, to tell the story of North Carolina's Word of Faith Fellowship and its dangerous leader, Jane Whaley. Whaley proclaimed herself a prophet and for her followers this means unflinching devotion and a willingness to let her control every aspect of their lives.  Part of what makes Broken Faith so compelling is the account of one family who escaped Whaley's grip after 20 years. I'm really curious as to what life was like for them, and how they were manipulated into an unshakable belief in Whaley and her doctrine.  Should be an interesting weekend read! —Seira Wilson




Print Book
Kindle Book
Audible Audiobook

Everything I Know About Love by Dolly Alderton

Dolly Alderton’s memoir has been described as Nora Ephron for the Tinder age, and so far, it is an apt description. Dolly is wild, funny, and audacious—she is the friend you have always wanted; if that is, you don’t already have a ‘Dolly’ in your orbit. Granted, some of her hijinks are a little extreme but her stories of wild nights out and the hilarious situations she gets herself into (and out of) are both an entertainment and a comfort. Dolly is obsessed with boys and fun (drinking is up there too) and she takes no pains to tell you otherwise. Her memoir, which was a bestseller in the UK, is a romp through her teens and twenties. Throughout her dalliances with boys—whether via MSN messenger, in person or on Tinder—it is her girlfriends who she keeps coming back to. I'm absolutely loving her humor, her honesty, and her sass and can't wait to join her next party. —Al Woodworth



Print Book
Kindle Book
Audible Audiobook

Until the End of Time: Mind, Matter, and Our Search for Meaning in an Evolving Universe by Briane Greene

I’m not a math person, but even I can get swept up by the passion in sentences like this: “Yes, I thought. That is the romance of mathematics. Creativity constrained by logic and a set of axioms dictates how ideas can be manipulated and combined to reveal unshakeable truths.” Brian Greene—a string theorist who explained quarks and multiple dimensions so entertainingly in the best-selling The Elegant Universe—now tackles not just space and time but how our consciousness relates to it. I’m not very far into Until the End of Time (February 18), but I’m ready to have my mind blown, even if math is going to be involved. —Adrian Liang



Print Book
Kindle Book
Audible Audiobook

Beating About the Bush: An Agatha Raisin Mystery by M.C. Beaton

One of the first sad announcements of the New Year was word that M.C. Beaton, who created the detectives Hamish Macbeth and Agatha Raisin, had passed away. Marion Chesney Gibbons, her given name, had actually written about 160 romance and/or historical novels early in her career, but was largely unknown until she switched to writing mysteries in 1985. The genre switch was so successful that at one point Beaton was outselling J.K. Rowling in the UK. In Beating About the Bush, Agatha Raisin, the irascible, gin-swilling former PR exec turned sleuth, is distracted from investigating a case of industrial espionage by a surge of romantic feelings towards her friend-with-benefits, Sir Charles Fraith. This weekend there's no better way to honor a master of the genre than to spend some time with one of her best creations. —Vannessa Cronin


You might also like:

Sign up for the Amazon Book Review: Best books of the month * author interviews * the reading life * and more


Lists + Reviews

Best Books Literature + Fiction Nonfiction Kids + Young Adult Mystery, Thriller + Suspense Science Fiction + Fantasy Comics + Graphic Novels Romance Eating + Drinking

Authors

Interviews Guest Essays Celebrity Picks

News + Features

News Features Awards Podcast

Editors

Omnivoracious, The Amazon Book Review

Feeds Facebook Twitter YouTube