New Year, New Books - 10 Books We're Looking Forward to Reading in Early 2018

Adrian Liang on January 17, 2018
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It's not too late to set yourself a reading goal for 2018!

We at the Amazon Book Review read literally hundreds of books a year so we can highlight for you the ones we think are the best, but there are always a handful of books that we get especially excited about as we look to build our own TBR piles.

Our editors have pulled aside ten titles that stand out for us as brand-new books we're recommending to everyone—or that we can't wait to read in the coming months.


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The Great Alone: A Novel by Kristin Hannah - Kristin Hannah's mega bestseller The Nightingale is still flying off shelves, but she is not resting on her literary laurels. Her latest novel, The Great Alone, will be released on February 6. In it a damaged Vietnam vet named Ernt moves his family to the wilds of Alaska. Initially it's a welcome change, but as winter approaches, and Ernt's mental state deteriorates, his wife and daughter find themselves in an increasingly precarious position. The Great Alone promises to be a terrifically tense page turner. (Releases February 6.) —Erin Kodicek

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Skin in the Game: Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life by Nassim Nicholas Taleb - I tend to wait around for Nassim Taleb’s books to show up on my desk. In a world where ideas all start to sound the same, he stands out. In Skin in the Game, the author of The Black Swan and Antifragile discusses, among other things, how action is a whole lot more important than theory and how the micro usually supersedes the macro. (Releases February 27.) —Chris Schluep

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The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border by Francisco Cantú - These days, mention of “the Border” stirs both imagination and emotion, what you see and feel depending on how you perceive the world. But how many of us understand this real-world interzone where actual borders shift and bleed, and hard scenes of death, drug smuggling, and human suffering unfold daily? Written by Border Patrol agent Francisco Cantú in direct, stoic prose, The Line Becomes a River shows us the starkest realities of the southwest desert. (Releases February 6.) —Jon Foro

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White Houses: A Novel by Amy Bloom - Amy Bloom has such an intelligent, urbane sensibility that I’m always excited to read her latest book. In White Houses, a historical novel, she imagines the love affair between First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and journalist Lorena Hickok. Those two women came from very different backgrounds, but in Bloom’s narrative, theirs was a passionate, tender love—if complicated by character and circumstance. (Releases February 13.) —Sarah Harrison Smith

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Still Me: A Novel by Jojo Moyes - Fans of the novels Me Before You and After You will count the days until January 30, when they can be reunited with Lou Clark, now on her way to a fresh start in New York even as she attempts to keep a long-distance relationship alive. Moyes delivers one-two punches of laughter and tears in her nuanced novels, and all signs point to this one being another keeper. (Releases January 30.) —Adrian Liang

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Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi - This novel has been getting a lot of buzz, and for good reason. It’s a unique book with a unique young voice—adventurous, emotional, absurd, and very bookish. You should check this out if you’re looking for a story that’s inspirational, a little challenging, and different. (Releases February 6.) —Chris Schluep

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The Woman in the Window: A Novel by A. J. Finn - A debut novel, this psychological thriller about an agoraphobic woman who witnesses a crime has all the hallmarks of being the next Gone Girl or The Girl on the Train. Once you start reading, you just can’t stop…. (Available now.) —Seira Wilson

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The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin - I’m really enjoying The Immortalists, a new novel by Chloe Benjamin. In it, Benjamin, who is only 28, tells the story of four teenage siblings who, on a lark, ask a soothsayer to reveal the dates of their deaths. That information—credible or not—warps their choices as they grow into adulthood. This is a deeply moving second novel with the kind of assured style and long-sighted wisdom you’d expect only from a much older, more experienced writer. (Available now.) —Sarah Harrison Smith

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Force of Nature: A Novel by Jane Harper - Jane Harper’s The Dry was one of our Best Books of 2017, and her second mystery with special agent Aaron Falk looks just as promising. Multiple narrators flesh out a twisty story of a company team-building exercise in the Australian wilderness that goes horribly wrong. (Releases February 6.) —Seira Wilson

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Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover - When she was a young girl, Tara Westover knew that her family was different because the school bus drove past their remote Idaho property, but never stopped to pick them up. (A few of her brothers and sisters didn't even have birth certificates.) She didn't see the inside of a classroom until she was seventeen years old, but it was an experience that dramatically changed the trajectory of her life. Westover’s memoir, Educated, chronicles how she survived her survivalist upbringing, eventually earning a PhD from Cambridge University. It's an inspiring reminder that knowledge is, indeed, power. (Releases February 20.) —Erin Kodicek


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