Weekend Reading

Chris Schluep on August 03, 2018
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This weekend, we will all be thinking about our fellow editor Jon Foro, who is climbing Mount Rainier late next week. He's taking the entirety of next week off; but don't worry, he's still got a reading adventure planned. So do the rest of us--only we'll be lying in bed or sitting on the couch, and not in a tent at Camp Muir. This is one week where we wouldn't blame Jon if he didn't get much reading done.


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I was just on vacation with a friend who is also a voracious reader, and usually it's me passing books off to her, but this time she'd gotten hold of a galley of The Dinner List (out September 11) and proceeded to power through it with great enthusiasm. I've had The Dinner List on my desk for a while, and after her rave review I've dug it out. A light read with the premise of a dinner party with your favorite imagined guests that actually happens--in this case with Audrey Hepburn--it's been described as romantic and magical. Sounds perfect for a relaxing weekend read. -- Seira Wilson


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I’m off next week, heading out for an adventure involving a big mountain, so I’m going to take something that most people would have read much earlier in their lives, something that I might otherwise think is too late for me to read. I’m not exactly expecting a load of transcendence from Jack Kerouac’s The Dharma Bums, but I’d like to read something about mountains (Kerouac writes about spending time alone as a fire lookout in Washington’s North Cascades) that doesn’t end in tragedy or even discomfort, which is my usual fare. I’ll save that for later. —Jon Foro


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I’m starting to see a trend of people wanting to read positive, heartwarming books, and as a regular romance reader, I’m eager to jump on that bandwagon. A number of readers here have gone bonkers over the debut novel Meet Me at the Museum (out August 7), a charming yet moving book about a middle-aged farmwife in England who begins correspondence with a male widowed museum curator in Denmark. Initially they discuss Tollund Man (a man mummified thousands of years ago in a bog), but as the letters continue, they move into deeper topics of choices made and the possibilities of the future self. I’ve seen the expressions on my fellow editors’ face as they talk about this book, and I can’t wait to put that happy, semi-swoony expression on my own face after finishing this book.  -- Adrian Liang


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I’ll be thinking back-to-school thoughts this weekend, and finishing up His Favorites, a new novel by National-Book-Award nominee Kate Walbert. Walbert’s slim, delicately crafted story concerns a 15-year-old girl and her predatory teacher, but more broadly, it’s about secret truths – truths the adults in the narrator’s life don’t necessarily want to hear. “This is not a story I’ve told before,” she begins. “No one would believe me. I mean, really believe me….They would ask certain questions that suggested I was somehow culpable or that I was making most of it up out of nothing.” Though His Favorites speaks to our era’s focus on sexual coercion, Walbert’s prose deserves to last much longer than the #MeToo moment we’re in. – Sarah Harrison Smith



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