The most highly quotable nonfiction on Charts

Chris Schluep on May 04, 2020
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The most quotable nonfiction on Charts

As regular visitors to the Amazon Charts lists know, business and self-help books sell well and have enthusiastic readers. It turns out that they also inspire readers to highlight passages, making them among the most Highly Quotable of books.

Here are 10 of the most Highly Quotable nonfiction books to have ever appeared on Charts, along with a popular highlight from each.

When it comes to nonfiction, it is clear that people tend to highlight practical advice.



The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel van der Kolk, M.D.

Traumatic stress comes in many forms. In The Body Keeps the Score, an expert in trauma offers advice on how to recover and heal.

“For real change to take place, the body needs to learn that the danger has passed and to live in the reality of the present.”


Atomic Habits by James Clear

One of the breakout books of 2018, Atomic Habits is all about introducing simple behaviors that will turn into a lifetime’s worth of habits.

“Goals are about the results you want to achieve. Systems are about the processes that lead to those results.”


The Untethered Soul by Michael A. Singer

The Untethered Soul promotes mindfulness to let go of those thought loops that clutter your thinking and muddy your existence.

“Eventually you will see that the real cause of problems is not life itself. It’s the commotion the mind makes about life that really causes problems.”


Becoming Supernatural by Dr. Joe Dispenza

If you’re looking to live a more mystical life, author Joe Dispenza offers you the opportunity to tap into energy and streams of consciousness that will improve mind, body, and spirit.

“The only way we can change our lives is to change our energy — to change the electromagnetic field we are constantly broadcasting. In other words, to change our state of being, we have to change how we think and how we feel.”


Principles by Ray Dalio

One of the country’s most successful investors shares the rules he developed during his storied career — organized into principles that anyone can follow.

“Maturity is the ability to reject good alternatives in order to pursue even better ones.”


Never Split the Difference by Chris Voss with Tahl Raz

A former FBI negotiator shares the often counterintuitive tricks to negotiating with anyone, from your boss to your dog.

“The goal is to identify what your counterparts actually need (monetarily, emotionally, or otherwise) and get them feeling safe enough to talk and talk and talk some more about what they want.”


The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle

Tolle reveals what he has learned about how to live in the Now, relieving one’s self of pain and abandoning the ego in order to know the true self.

“Pleasure is always derived from something outside you, whereas joy arises from within.”


Tools of Titans by Tim Ferriss

Tim Ferriss has interviewed hundreds of immensely successful people in his podcast. In this book, he encapsulates the routines and habits that have made them great.

“The superheroes you have in your mind (idols, icons, titans, billionaires, etc.) are nearly all walking flaws who’ve maximized 1 or 2 strengths.”


Untamed by Glennon Doyle

Glennon Doyle’s memoir focuses on how women can find peace when they stop trying to live up to external expectations and start answering to their inner selves.

“Brave means living from the inside out. Brave means, in every uncertain moment, turning inward, feeling for the Knowing, and speaking it out loud.”


These Truths by Jill Lepore

The only history book on this list, These Truths is a single volume American history written by Harvard professor and New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore. Her work seeks to expand the story of our nation to include many relevant names and events that, over the centuries, have been marginalized and forgotten.

“Between 1500 and 1800, roughly two and a half million Europeans moved to the Americas; they carried twelve million Africans there by force; and as many as fifty million Native Americans died, chiefly of disease.”


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