Weekend Reading

Al Woodworth on December 27, 2019
Share

Many of us will be surrounded by family and friends this weekend, but, as always, the editors will carve time out to read and get lost in the words of writers. It seems all of us are looking forward to the New Year and are reading books publishing in 2020—from beloved fiction writers like Emma Straub, Aravind Adiga, Lisa Gardner, and Lydia Yuknavitch to a book on improving your habits, and a debut set in India....


Print Book
Kindle Book
Audible Audiobook

All Adults Here by Emma Straub

Indulge me this holiday week to read what I want to read, even if it’s horribly ahead of “schedule.” Before the holidays, I received an advance copy of Emma Straub’s upcoming All Adults Here (May 2020), and tucked it inside my suitcase to save for this very special week. Between being an accomplished author and the owner—with her husband—of the Brooklyn bookstore Books Are Magic, Straub is high on the list of Literary People I Admire. In her upcoming novel, Straub tackles parenting and family, which seems like just the thing to read while I’m spending time with my own. I suspect we’ll all be hearing a lot more about this novel in 2020. —Sarah Gelman


Print Book
Kindle Book
Audible Audiobook

Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything by BJ Fogg

Two of my colleagues have been talking this book up and though it’s not typically the sort of thing I would pick up, now’s as good a time as any with the New Year upon us. Tiny Habits is a prescriptive guide for changing behaviors that are impeding us from achieving goals ranging from getting more sleep, to losing weight, to reducing stress and anxiety, to drinking less boozy eggnog (that can’t just be me right now). Who’s with me?! —Erin Kodicek


Print Book
Kindle Book
Audible Audiobook

Verge by Lidia Yuknavitch

When I'm in a pile with my family like I will be this weekend, it's best for me to read in short bursts, otherwise, delicious smells from the kitchen, waterfalls of laughter, or a puppy wanting to play will inevitably intrude. So I am thrilled to be reading Lydia Yuknavitch's new story collection coming in February 2020. In her blurb, Melissa Febos calls Verge "a bouquet of dynamite: explosive, deadly, and spectacularly beautiful"...which seems like the only possible kind of book that could fend off my thundering and exuberant family in the other room. —Al Woodworth

Shop on Amazon
Print Book | Kindle Book


Print Book
Kindle Book

Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line by Deepa Anappara

I’m a sucker for novels with child narrators, so Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line (February 4) is right up my alley. Nine-year-old Jai decides that the crime-solving skills he has picked up from TV will help him and his two friends solve the mystery behind another child’s disappearance. But when more children start vanishing from their neighborhood on the edge of a crowded Indian city, the investigation becomes perilous. —Adrian Liang


Print Book
Kindle Book
Audible Audiobook

Amnesty by Aravind Adiga

This novel is written by the Booker Prize-winning author of The White Tiger, and it’s a mixture of great writing, topicality, and wonderful plot. I don’t like giving away too much plot—but Amnesty, which will be published in February, revolves around an illegal Sri Lankan immigrant to Australia, who nonetheless has succeeded in creating a new life there. When a murder takes place, he thinks he might be able to provide information. But what should he do? Does a person without rights still bear responsibilities? —Chris Schluep


Print Book
Kindle Book
Audible Audiobook

When You See Me by Lisa Gardner

Some authors only ever produce one character that resonates with audiences; some, like Lisa Gardner, are able to produce several. And when three of them team up, as they do in When You See Me, it’s a must-read. I love the D.D. Warren character: a smart, relentless detective. She’s worked with Flora Dane, a woman kidnapped as a college student, who now works to bring other girls home, in another series. Now add FBI Agent Kimberly Quincy—a favorite from another of Gardner’s series—to work a cold case in a small town, and I’m already hooked. —Vannessa Cronin


Print Book
Kindle Book
Audible Audiobook

Highfire by Eoin Colfer

After the holidays I just want to lie around and ideally read something funny. Eoin Colfer’s upcoming novel, Highfire, sounds like exactly what I’m looking for. Highfire is about a lonely, vodka-swilling dragon, the last of his kind, who has lost his mojo for fire breathing and fearmongering. The once magnificent beast known as Lord Highfire is now just Vern, hiding out from tourists in a Louisiana swamp. When a 15-year-old local nicknamed Squib gets into trouble with a crooked lawman, Vern finds his swamp hideout invaded and a strikes a deal with the young man that may turn them into friends. I’ve read most of Colfer’s novels for young readers—love the Artemis Fowl series in particular—but Highfire will my first Colfer adult read. The book description sounds like it might be a Carl Hiaassen-Terry Pratchett love child, but also 100% uniquely Eoin Colfer. Stay tuned… —Seira Wilson

You might also like:

Subscribe to the Amazon Book Review, featuring picks for the best books of the month, author interviews, reading recommendations, and more from the Amazon Books editors.



Lists + Reviews

Best Books Literature + Fiction Nonfiction Kids + Young Adult Mystery, Thriller + Suspense Science Fiction + Fantasy Comics + Graphic Novels Romance Eating + Drinking

Authors

Interviews Guest Essays Celebrity Picks

News + Features

News Features Awards Podcast

Editors

Omnivoracious, The Amazon Book Review

Feeds Facebook Twitter YouTube