2019 James Beard Award Winners

Seira Wilson on April 29, 2019
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The winners of this year's James Beard Foundation Book Awards were announced and the list includes both familiar names and welcome newcomers.  It was fun to see some of our own favorites and best of 2018 picks among them--it was a really stellar year for cookbooks. Below are the winning titles in five categories, congratulations to all!

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Book of the Year: Cocktail Codex by Alex Day, Nick Fauchald, and David Kaplan, with Devon Tarby

Masters of mixology and the authors of Death & Co.: Modern Classic Cocktails took home the big prize with their inspired new book that was worth the wait. With this bible of booze, those of us at home will learn the techniques and basic recipes that are the backbone of classic and original cocktails.


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Writing: Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine by Edward Lee

Chef and author Edward Lee's account of his two year adventure to uncover the stories behind the far-reaching diversity and influences of what people are cooking and eating across America today. 40 recipes add flavor to the sixteen fascinating chapters of Buttermilk Graffiti.


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General: Milk Street: Tuesday Nights by Christopher Kimball

Kimball is a world traveler, and the 200 recipes in Milk Street: Tuesday Nights reflect his global outlook on food with dinners that are short on time, big on flavor. 


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Baking and Desserts: SUQAR: Desserts & Sweets from the Modern Middle East by Greg Malouf and Lucy Malouf

One of the most gorgeous cookbooks of last year, in my opinion. 100 sweets, from or inspired by, the Middle East, open up a world of possibility and flavor.


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American: Between Harlem and Heaven: Afro-Asian-American Cooking for Big Nights, Weeknights, and Every Day by JJ Johnson and Alexander Smalls with Veronica Chambers

The history of the Harlem food scene told in essays and recipes that celebrate and honor the melding of African, Asian, and African-American influences.

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