Sarah Harrison Smith
Sarah Harrison Smith
Editorial Director, Books and Kindle: Sarah Harrison Smith spent her childhood with her nose in a book and not much has changed. Happy to read almost anything, she’s especially drawn to literary fiction and biographies of artists, writers and politicians, with a particular soft spot for 19th century oddballs. Other interests: the visual arts, architecture, and children’s books.

Recent posts by Sarah

Two New Books for the Medically Minded

Whether you are searching for a holiday gift for the doctor in your family, or are fascinated by brilliant minds, these new books--one memoir, one history--offer intriguing looks at the lives and work of two eminent surgeons. 

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Louise Erdrich's Dystopian Vision

"Sure, there’s a political agenda to everything I write.  But the story always comes first."

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Looking Again at a National Book Critics Circle Finalist: Caroline Fraser's Biography of Laura Ingalls Wilder

"One of the extraordinary stories of Wilder’s life is her relationship with her daughter and the ways in which it helps create these classic books. There really isn’t any other relationship like it in literary history that I am aware of."

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The Winners of the 2017 National Book Awards

Last night, at the 2017 National Book Awards ceremony in New York, judges announced the winners of the annual prize in four categories: Young People's Literature, Poetry, Nonfiction, and Fiction.

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Talking to Anne Fadiman About Her Memoir, "The Wine Lover's Daughter."

"Books and wine were interconnected in his mind. Both represented the patrician life that he always imagined lay on the other side of the river."

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Announcing the Editors' Best Books of 2017

There's something to please every reader on this list of the Best Books of 2017. We loved every one of them and hope you will, too.

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A Different Way of Looking at History

"All the skills you might want your child to learn can be taught through what they’re interested in. Curiosity should be at the heart of how we reform our education in the future," says Christopher Lloyd, whose "Wallbooks" might change how you view history.

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Uncovering the Story of the Washingtons' Runaway Slave

In the run-up to the National Book Awards next month, we spoke to finalist Erica Armstrong Dunbar, who spent nine years researching the life of Ona Judge, the fugitive slave whose "life story forces readers to examine George and Martha Washington in different and difficult ways."

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Talking to Francesca Hornak about "Seven Days of Us."

In this hilarious and heartwarming new novel, a family quarantines itself in the ancestral home for the holidays, but nothing goes quite as planned.

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A Taste of "France is a Feast: The Photographic Journey of Paul and Julia Child"

"In France, Paul and Julia were deeply in love—with each other, with photography and food, with the people and the places they encountered. ... 'I was so excited' to be in that place at that time, Julia recalled, 'that I sometimes forgot to breathe.' ”

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Celebrating a Beloved Bunny

The blue-jacketed-bunny book was first published this month in 1902. Beatrix Potter's biographer tells us a little more about the great writer, illustrator and conservationist -- and which of Potter's stories was the most autobiographical.

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When Doing Your Job Means Risking Your Life

These three women put everything on the line to report from abroad.

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Picture Books to Inspire Artists of Any Age

These female artists demonstrate that vision, accompanied by perseverance, hard work, and independence, can take women where they want to go -- even into the pages of a picture book.

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Five New Picture Books About Women Artists

This season, new picture books about female artists highlight their strength, talent, and perseverance.

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What's Kept "A Gentleman in Moscow" on the Bestseller Lists?

“There are a lot of literary novels that everyone loves that immediately fall away from the bestseller lists. But no matter what thrillers come and go, 'A Gentleman in Moscow' is still there,” says Ron Charles, fiction editor at the Washington Post. Which begs the question: what is it about this novel that gives it such staying power? 

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